Computer Graphics Laboratory ETH Zurich

ETH

Alternating Attention in Continuous Stereoscopic Depth

S. Poulakos, G. Roethlin, A. Schwaninger, A. Smolic, M. Gross

Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception (Vancouver, Canada, August 8-9, 2014), pp. 59-66
[Abstract] [BibTeX] [PDF]

Abstract

The decoupling of eye vergence and accommodation (V/A) has been found to negatively impact depth interpretation, visual comfort and fatigue. In this paper, we explore a hypothesis that placement of visual cues within a scene can assist a viewer in the process of maintaining the V/A decoupling. This is demonstrated through the use of a continuous depth plane that connects spatially distinct scene elements. Our experimental design enables us to make the following three contributions: (1) We show that a continuous depth element can improve the time it takes to transition visual attention in depth. (2) We observe that the subjective assessment of fatigue emerges before we detect a quantitative decline in performance. (3) We aim to motivate that stereoscopic 3D content creators may learn scene composition, framing and montage from visual psychophysics.

@inproceedings{Poulakos:2014:AAC:2628257.2628260,
author = {Poulakos, Steven and Roethlin, Gerhard and Schwaninger, Adrian and Smolic, Aljoscha and Gross, Markus},
title = {Alternating Attention in Continuous Stereoscopic Depth},
booktitle = {Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on Applied Perception},
series = {SAP '14},
year = {2014},
isbn = {978-1-4503-3009-1},
location = {Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada},
pages = {59--66},
numpages = {8},
url = {http://doi.acm.org/10.1145/2628257.2628260},
doi = {10.1145/2628257.2628260},
acmid = {2628260},
publisher = {ACM},
address = {New York, NY, USA},
keywords = {depth continuity, stereoscopic 3D, visual attention},
}
[Download BibTeX]

Overview

Figure 1: Visualization of different forms of the two-shot. Actor positions are fixed in depth. (A) Represents an over-the-shoulder shot without depth continuity. Insets (B-D) represent potential ways to provide depth continuity.

The decoupling of eye vergence and accommodation (V/A) has been found to negatively impact depth interpretation, visual comfort and fatigue. In this paper, we explore a hypothesis that placement of visual cues within a scene can assist a viewer in the process of maintaining the V/A decoupling. This is demonstrated through the use of a continuous depth plane that connects spatially distinct scene elements. Our experimental design enables us to make the following three contributions: (1) We show that a continuous depth element can improve the time it takes to transition visual attention in depth. (2) We observe that the subjective assessment of fatigue emerges before we detect a quantitative decline in performance. (3) We aim to motivate that stereoscopic 3D content creators may learn scene composition, framing and montage from visual psychophysics.

Downloads

Download Paper
[PDF]